Keep Your Bank, Max Your Cash

With Max, earn more on your cash while keeping your existing checking account, or using a brokerage account.

You’d like your cash to earn more — but you don’t want to switch banks.

Enter Max, an intelligent cash management service for intelligent investors. It offers a way to see all your cash at once, while earning you higher yield and obtaining broader FDIC insurance coverage. Max even simplifies tax season, delivering all 1099-INT statements by email in a single password-protected PDF.

Max works with your existing checking account — unless you’d rather open a new checking account or use your brokerage account. Here’s how:

 

Transactional Checking Account

Most investors have a checking account at a bank that they use to pay bills, accept direct deposit of their paychecks or partnership distributions, and manage their household finances. Many Max members link this checking account to Max, because they value Max’s automated optimization that restores their checking account to their pre-set target balance each month..  For example, if you tell Max that you wish to keep $30,000 in checking, but Max finds only $22,000 at the time of your monthly optimization, it will pull $8,000 from savings to bring you back to your target balance of $30,000.  Similarly, if Max finds excess cash sitting in your checking account, it will automatically be swept to your online savings accounts, where it can earn more. We typically advise that clients set their target checking account balance to be slightly higher than their monthly working capital needs, to ensure an ample cash cushion.

 

Separate Checking Account

Some Max members elect to open a new checking account reserved specifically for Max. They move into this account any funds they wish to optimize, link their online savings accounts, and start optimizing. Often they set a low target balance on this checking account, since they don’t plan to use it for any purpose aside from Max.

This setup functions much like a separately managed account, allowing members to cordon off a specific amount of cash to be optimized, separate from the other cash in their portfolios, and not impacted by their daily transactional activity. They can view and manage this cash from the Max dashboard, and when they need to access this cash, they can move it back to the checking account using Max’s Intelligent Funds TransferSM feature, or wire it elsewhere directly from their online bank accounts. It’s easy to open a new checking account online, without visiting a bank branch.

 

Brokerage Account

Many people keep a significant portion of their cash in their brokerage account. Max supports bank and cash management accounts at brokerage houses including Charles Schwab Bank and Fidelity. This strategy takes full advantage of Max to garner additional FDIC coverage and higher interest rates on the cash that’s not currently invested. Most brokerage accounts pay less than 0.1% on your deposits, while the Max average is 1.00%. Historically, investors who chose to maintain cash as dry powder, on hand to deploy when market opportunities presented themselves, typically lost out on the ability to earn interest on these funds. With Max, that’s no longer a problem. You can earn dramatically more while keeping your cash liquid and easily accessible, within reach when it’s time to trade.  Since the average HNW investor is holding 23.7% of his or her portfolio in cash, picking up an extra 0.90% of interest income on cash is equivalent to earning an extra 0.21% across your entire portfolio.

Learn more about setting up your Max account or read our one-page setup guide. Have questions? Ask Max Member Services at member.services@maxmyinterest.com.

Fiduciary Solutions for Financial Advisors: How to Think About Clients’ Cash

Max members are earning about 10 times more on their cash than the national average.

Max members are earning about 10 times more on their cash than the national average.

With the move towards the fiduciary standard across the investment-management landscape, financial advisors increasingly are looking at how they can make sure their clients are getting this standard of advice for the cash portion of their portfolios as well as for their securities. That’s where Max comes in. 

Cash is the one asset class that’s present in every portfolio. But a near-zero-interest-rate environment over the last few years has meant that investors overwhelmingly are earning almost nothing on cash. The national average on savings accounts is 11 basis points — 0.11%. As a fiduciary, an advisor is bound to give advice that’s in a client’s best interest financially. For cash, this means advisors have to seek out ways that clients can earn more interest while remaining insured under the FDIC deposit guarantees.

– Think carefully before using money market funds

Money market funds are a traditional substitute for cash, because they’re designed always to trade at a stable $1 per share. But with new regulations, these funds may now be able to hold onto investors’ money if markets are in turmoil. That means that clients may not be able to get their money out of a money market fund when they need it most. With this lower level of safety, and essentially no yield, money market funds may not be up to the fiduciary standard as a cash equivalent.  

– Use online banks

Online banks don’t have branches, so their cost structure is considerably less than their brick-and-mortar competitors. This imbalance allows them to offer higher interest rates to depositors — above 1%, in some cases, making online banks the highest-yielding places to park cash that clients wish to keep fully liquid. FDIC-insured online banks have the same federal deposit guarantee as any other U.S. bank protected under the program.

– Seek more FDIC coverage

Many investors don’t realize that exceeding the FDIC limits in their accounts means that excess money may not be safe if something happens to the bank. If your clients hold more cash than the FDIC limit — $250,000 per depositor, per account type, per institution — you should consider helping them open accounts at additional banks to gain FDIC coverage for as much of their cash as possible. Keeping cash safe is a prerequisite for fiduciaries.

– How Max can help

It’s possible to get both higher interest on cash and greater FDIC coverage. That’s what Max provides for advisors and their clients through the Max Advisor Dashboard. The average Max client is currently earning more than 1.00% on cash and enjoying FDIC coverage across several institutions. Learn more about how you and your clients can benefit at MaxForAdvisors.com.

When Cash Beats Treasury Bonds

The U.S. Treasury in Washington, D.C. (Source: Treasury.gov)

The U.S. Treasury in Washington, D.C. (Source: Treasury.gov)

Certain truths are thought to be self-evident, like the idea that bonds always pay more than cash in the bank. In today’s interest-rate environment, that’s not true. The highest interest Max members can earn is now 1.05%, while the 5-year U.S. Treasury bond currently yields 1.03% and the 3-year bond yields 0.77%. It’s part of the worldwide flight to high-quality assets after the U.K.’s vote to leave the European Union. Many investors are worried that “Brexit” may severely hurt the world’s economy.

What does this mean for investors? Both yields are backed by the U.S. government; the Treasury bond is a government obligation, while Max members are holding their cash within FDIC-insured savings accounts at online banks that are also guaranteed by the government. So the risk profile is the same.

FDIC-insured bank deposits are fully liquid, meaning you can withdraw your money at any time. Bonds, on the other hand, aren’t risk-free; changes in interest rates can cause their prices to rise or fall, introducing what’s known as duration risk. If you buy a bond now and then yields rise, you’re locked in at the old, lower yield, meaning the market will be willing to pay less for your bond and the price will fall.  So unless you hold it to maturity — the entire five years — you’ll lose money.

While buying a Treasury bond means you’re exposed to changes in interest rates, Max members benefit from optimized rates. If the rates on their online savings accounts change, Max will automatically rebalance their funds into higher-earning accounts.

So why would anyone buy Treasury bonds?  Normally, if you’re willing to lock up your money for longer periods of time, you get paid more for taking that duration risk. But not today. At these yields, you can earn more with overnight bank deposits than you can even on a five-year Treasury.  This inefficiency impacts hundreds of billions of dollars of cash held by individual investors.

We built Max to make it easier for individual investors to more effectively manage the cash that they hold, whether it’s in their bank accounts or brokerage accounts.  Max simultaneously delivers higher yield and broader FDIC insurance coverage, with full liquidity, and without switching banks.  

The national average yield on cash held in savings accounts is 0.11%, and many bank and brokerage accounts pay even less. If you’d like to earn more on your cash, or are seeking broader FDIC insurance coverage, or want to keep your funds fully liquid and don’t want to take the risk of investing in Treasurys when it seems like yields have nowhere to go but up (and thus the value of those bonds have nowhere to go but down), keeping cash in high-yielding online savings accounts might be the answer for you.

You can learn more about Max by visiting www.MaxMyInterest.com.

When Your Bank Deposits Aren’t FDIC Insured: Why Deposit Insurance Matters

Understanding FDIC limits can keep your cash safe in the bank.

Understanding FDIC limits can keep your cash safe in the bank.

 

When the stock market experiences choppiness and the global economy teeters, investors wonder about the safety of their money in the bank. In the U.S., we’re fortunate that our cash, with certain limitations, is protected by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). This means that as long as you keep your deposits within the limits, your cash in the bank is safe, no matter what happens to the bank.

Here are 5 things to know about the FDIC and your money.

 

FDIC insurance limits

During the global financial crisis that began in 2007, the FDIC limit was raised from $100,000 per depositor, per account type, per institution, to $250,000. This means that a couple can keep $1 million in a single bank: $250,000 in the first spouse’s name, $250,000 in the second spouse’s name, and $500,000 — or $250,000 each — in a joint account held in both their names. If you hold more than this amount in cash, you may want to open accounts at multiple banks.

 

Banks involved

Most U.S. banks are part of FDIC. Those that are will display the FDIC logo on their website and in their branches. If you don’t see it, ask, or check the FDIC website.

 

What’s covered

Here’s the list of accounts that the FDIC insures at banks: “checking, NOW (Negotiable Order of Withdrawal) accounts, savings accounts, money market deposit accounts, and certificates of deposit (CDs).” Note that money-market funds are not a bank product and don’t fall under FDIC protection. What’s also not covered are any investments you hold: “stocks, bonds, mutual funds, life insurance policies, annuities, or municipal securities, even if you purchased these products from an insured bank or savings association.”

You can check to what extent your own accounts are covered with the FDIC’s Electronic Deposit Insurance Estimator.  

 

Ways to get more coverage

Some banks hold multiple bank charters and may spread your deposit accounts across these charters. That will increase the amount of FDIC insurance you are entitled to claim. Ask your bank about this.

 

Managing your accounts

If you hold a significant amount of cash, spreading it out among different institutions in FDIC-insured parcels is a smart way to increase your amount of deposit insurance. Be sure to monitor the accounts so that your cash doesn’t exceed the limit at each bank. Max handles this automatically for members. Learn how Max can help you optimize your FDIC-insured cash.

Cash: Making the Most of a Turbulent Market

Be wise and optimize: Start with cash.

Be wise and optimize: Start with cash.

With the stock market off to a violent start to the year, many investors are looking to an asset class that performed better than equities last year: cash.

In 2015, most cash in the bank earned, essentially, zero: the average bank savings account paid depositors about 10 basis points, or 0.10%. But those investors savvy enough to put their money in online-bank savings accounts earned up to 1.05% on FDIC-insured cash.

That’s a healthy return, compared to the equities market. In 2015 the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 2.2% and the S&P 500 declined by 0.7%, according to the Wall Street Journal. Poor returns are contributing to the growing number of pension funds and other institutional investors who are warehousing cash — as much as 10% to 15% of some portfolios, the newspaper found.

For individuals who also feel they should hold cash on the sidelines — either because they’ve adopted a conservative, capital-preservation stance, or because they want to reserve dry powder for market buying opportunities — the difference between 10 basis points and 100 basis points on cash is significant, particularly when compounded over time. It’s even more material when the stock market itself is in decline.

And rates probably won’t stay this low forever. Now that the Federal Reserve finally has raised interest rates, online banks likely will raise their rates more rapidly than bricks-and-mortar banks, because their cost structures are more flexible. Investors who already have online savings accounts for their cash will benefit from this trend. Those who use Max to optimize their cash will see higher rates automatically, when the banks raise them, since Max automatically helps funds flow to whichever banks are offering the highest yields.  

For cash held on the sidelines, it makes sense to earn as much as possible, while protecting principal by ensuring full FDIC coverage. Risk, and the volatility of risky returns, are for other asset classes. Cash is stable, and should churn out a steady yield while staying safe. Learn how Max can help investors earn more on the cash within their portfolios.

Guest Post: Where to Go When Cash Is King

James Sanford of Sag Harbor Advisors

James Sanford of Sag Harbor Advisors

With interest rates remaining low, many investors wonder how to evaluate the safety of various places to keep cash. Max invited financial advisor James Sanford of Sag Harbor Advisors, a performance-fee-based wealth manager, to talk about how best to think about choices for cash in a portfolio.


By James Sanford

With the Federal Reserve now expected to wait at least until the December meeting to end 8 years of zero interest rates, and some strategists putting the first lift-off out to March or June of 2016, it’s time to revisit where to put your cash when cash is king. Two-year Treasury notes are now down to 63 basis points. Emerging market weakness in China and commodity-centric nations led to a 12% decline in the S&P 500 from July through September 28, and a surge in the Volatility Index (VIX) to over 40. If you’re with me in the camp to move a substantial amount of the portfolio to cash after the Central-Bank-fueled reversal rally of more than 10% since October 1, it’s important to understand where your broker or advisor places your cash, which is called the “cash sweep.” If swept into money market funds, you’re not in cash at all, but merely a basket of short-term risky securities that earn a paltry yield of zero to 15 basis points.

First, these underlying securities contain corporate credit risk of default like any other corporate bond. Second, there’s no legal guarantee of a “par put” from the manager. Money market funds routinely maintain a fixed $1.00 par value, rather than mark to market, a convenient shell-game trick which completely hides the underlying volatility of the basket of securities in the portfolio, convincing the holder he owns a “cash equivalent.” What he actually owns is a portfolio of risky corporate senior unsecured-debt obligations, which despite their 7, 10, or 90-day maturity, are equal in recovery and default risk to corporate long bonds maturing 10 and 30 years from now. Some money market funds hold tax-free municipal bonds. These are commonly considered “risk free,” which is absolutely not the case, as investors learned the hard way in Detroit, several cities in California and Rhode Island, and, soon, Puerto Rico.

Usually the portfolio in a money market fund doesn’t move at all in price, due to its very short duration. That’s until a shock event hits one of the securities, which was the case with the Lehman Brothers default. Lehman, opened up Monday morning, September 15, 2008, at a bid-offer of $10 to 12 cents on the dollar.  Suddenly this “cash” equivalent lost 90 cents on the dollar. Roughly 35 to 40% of all investment company assets are comprised of money market funds, with 80% of corporations using money market funds to manage their cash balances, and 20% of household cash balances comprised of money market funds, according to a 2009 SEC report.

There is an investor perception that money market funds are insured by the manager due to the “never break the buck” concept. In fact, there is no legal requirement or guarantee that money managers must “never break the buck” or shield investors from losses. Many managers in 2008 compensated investors for losses in money market funds, because it was good for business and they had the capital. Those without the capital, such as the Reserve Fund, did not. Nobody legally had to.

So what advice would I give investors, as a financial advisor? Keep your cash in short-term T-bills? But there is very little if any interest. Take duration risk on longer dated Treasuries?  No.

The answer is more obvious then we think: it’s your common bank savings account. Investors can earn up to 1.1% on internet-only savings accounts that are 100% FDIC guaranteed, a guarantee as solid as U.S. Treasury bonds, yet one that offers overnight liquidity and no duration risk. In fact, investors would have to go all the way to the three-year note to earn a yield equal to the highest available online savings rates of 1.1%.  The counterparty risk of the bank offering the rate is immaterial. As long as it’s FDIC guaranteed, even in the event of an FDIC bank seizure, accounts holders with $250,000 or less, or $500,000 in a joint account for couples, will have unrestricted access to their cash. If the FDIC can’t honor its agreement, all investments will be set to zero. That would be the equivalent of a U.S. government default.

Advisors often don’t like using a savings account as the cash sweep option, as they can’t control the assets. At Sag Harbor Advisors, our clients’ advisor accounts at our custodian are linked via the ACH system to any bank account of their choice, and clients sign over authorization to draw specified funds back to the advisor account should we see market opportunities. For cash holdings that are well north of the FDIC limits, MaxMyInterest is the only way to efficiently manage funds.

Ask your advisor where your cash sweep is, what it’s yielding, and you might find it’s not really “cash” at all.  

 

The Role of Cash in Investor Portfolios

There’s global-volatility-roller-coasternothing like a little reprise of global market volatility to remind us that stocks don’t always go up.  That’s no reason to panic, of course, but sometimes it’s good to take a moment to reflect on portfolio theory and appreciate why most advisors don’t advocate a 100% allocation to equities.

Here at Max, we are not financial advisors, nor do we offer financial advice. Our goal is simply to help individual investors earn as much as possible on whatever portion of their portfolio that they — or their advisors — have chosen to hold in cash, while keeping it safe.  Today, our members are earning approximately 1.00% yield on their liquid cash, with FDIC insurance of up to $5 million per couple.  This works out to roughly 10x more interest income than paid in most savings or brokerage accounts and 20x more than most money market funds (which, it’s worth noting, are not insured.)

According to the most recent Capgemini/RBC Wealth Management World Wealth Report, 4.7 million high net worth households in North America — defined as those with more than $1 million of investable assets beyond their primary residence — are holding a collective $3.8 trillion dollars in cash & cash equivalents.  That works out to 23.7% of their portfolios.  Yet most financial advisors think that their clients are holding closer to 10% of their portfolios in cash. What accounts for the difference?  It seems as if Americans are more conservative than their financial advisors would seem to believe or advise.  They must be holding cash in other pockets — bank accounts, CDs, and money market funds outside the view of their advisors.

Why so much cash? There are several reasons. Some have to do with timing differences. A law firm partner might, for instance, receive monthly draws from the partnership, but pay estimated taxes quarterly. This results in a build up of cash that must be set aside to pay taxes. But if that cash is sitting in a regular checking or savings or brokerage account, it is likely dramatically under-earning its potential. Other households may be saving for a major purchase, such as a first or second home, or reserving funds against commitments made to invest in private equity funds. Again, cash set aside earning next to nothing creates a drag on the portfolio and represents a lost opportunity to earn on those funds.

Other investors are more strategic about their cash allocation. For some, it’s a hedge (amidst market volatility, where the values of stocks and bonds gyrate, it’s nice to have the comfort of an asset class that acts as a store of value.) For others, cash is an even more strategic asset – a form of dry powder, ready to be deployed when market opportunities present themselves.

For all the talk of cash being a zero return asset class, excess cash in a portfolio can also facilitate outsized gains. Looking back on the financial crisis of 2008-2009, an investor with cash on the sidelines, who was able to bravely dip a toe into the market while others were fearful, could have tripled her money simply by buying the S&P 500. Had that same investor been fully invested, she would have missed one of the greatest investment opportunities of our lifetimes. This past week’s market volatility again reminds us that having cash at the ready can mean the difference between fretting over falling share prices vs. capitalizing on opportunity.

Financial advisors should pay close attention to these statistics. Astute advisors know that they can deliver better financial advice if they have a truer picture of their clients’ assets, objectives, and risk tolerance. Bringing more of a client’s cash into view can help inform this discussion and lead to better investment outcomes. MaxMyInterest.com is one such tool that can be deployed to generate better returns for clients, both directly by way of higher yield, and indirectly, by assembling a pool of cash that’s ready to be deployed when volatility emerges.

American Express Raises its Online Savings Rate to 0.90%

What would you do with an extra 0.89% of interest each year?

What would you do with an extra 0.89% of interest each year?

Continuing the trend of rising interest rates, this morning American Express increased the rate it offers on its Personal Savings accounts to 0.90%. This represents American Express’ second rate increase in two months.

Online savings rates have been rising rapidly since December, with several banks now offering more than 1.00% in interest on FDIC-insured bank deposits. For investors, this represents a compelling opportunity to finally earn more on the cash portion of their portfolios after five years of near-zero interest rates.

This stands in contrast to the Bankrate.com national savings average, which remains stuck at a paltry 0.09%. Brick and mortar banks have much higher overhead costs than their online peers, which contributes to their lower rates. It’s the same dynamic that makes online shopping compelling: just as a toy might cost less at Amazon.com versus buying that same item at Toys-R-Us, online banks are able to pass on the efficiency of transacting online to their depositors by paying higher rates. Since online bank deposits are FDIC-insured in the same manner as brick-and-mortar bank deposits, depositors can rest easy knowing that their deposits at leading online banks such as GE Capital Bank, Barclays, Ally Bank and American Express are just as safe as deposits at their brick-and-mortar peers, so long as total deposits are held below the FDIC-insurance limits, currently $250,000 per bank, per depositor, per account type (individual and joint accounts count as separate account types.)

With Max, we’ve created a system that helps depositors mange their cash more intelligently. Our members link their existing brick-and-mortar savings accounts to a number of higher-yielding online bank accounts. Max then monitors changes in interest rates, and periodically tells your banks to transfer funds between your own accounts so as to maximize yield, even as interest rates change. By default, Max also helps keep your cash below the FDIC insurance limit at each bank, so that you know that your cash is safe. And with Max, there’s no change to the manner in which you interact with your existing bank – direct deposit, bill pay, and access to tellers and notaries remain unchanged.

With American Express’ latest rate increase, Max members are now earning a weighted average 0.98% on cash – that’s 0.89% more than the national savings average, and 0.97% than the yield on most money market funds. Today, many members are earning as much as 1.05% on their first $250,000 being optimized by Max.  And as rates continue to rise, Max members benefit automatically.

What could you do with an extra 0.89% of ‘found money’ each year? Save it, of course, and let it compound. Or donate it to your favorite charitable organization. Or take your family on a nice vacation. You can try out the Max calculator to see what this might mean for you.

Online Savings Rates Continue to Rise

Max members are continuing to benefit from a rise in rates offered by online banks.

This morning, American Express increased the interest rate paid on its Personal Savings online accounts to 0.85%.  This comes on the heels of GE Capital Bank‘s rate increase on Monday.

For Americans with substantial cash balances, the ability to spread deposits across multiple online banks helps keep larger amounts of cash safe via increased FDIC insurance, while dramatically increasing yield vs. other alternatives, such as brick-and-mortar savings accounts or money market funds.  Max makes it easy to manage a basket of these accounts, monitoring changes in interest rates and automatically reallocating cash among your accounts to seek the best combination of yield and FDIC insurance protection.  Max charges a small fee of 0.02% each quarter for this service.

For months we’ve been predicting a rise in rates, and in turn a widening of the spread between the yield available from the network of online banks supported by Max vs. the national savings average.  Max members are now earning a weighted average 0.93%, as compared to the Bankrate.com national savings average of 0.09% or most money market funds that yield only 0.01%.

More information about Max can be found at MaxMyInterest.com.

Why Cash Is The Overlooked, Underinvested Asset Class

MaxMyInterest founder Gary Zimmerman discusses why investors hold cash with Morningstar's Christine Benz.

MaxMyInterest founder Gary Zimmerman discusses why investors hold cash with Morningstar’s Christine Benz.

Do you hold cash in your portfolio? Of course you do. It’s the universal asset class. Everyone needs some degree of cash to manage their monthly expenses: homes, automobiles, tuition, travel, dining and entertainment. But how much cash is enough cash? Should you hold cash beyond what you need on a monthly basis? And how much are you earning on the cash portion of your portfolio?

For most high net worth investors, the bulk of their portfolios are comprised of domestic and international equities, tax-advantaged fixed income instruments, real estate, commodities and alternative investments like private equity, hedge funds or real assets. Yet today, cash represents a substantial portion of the portfolios of both individual investors and family offices. Most of it is earning next to nothing.

Forbes Magazine contributor Jim Cahn recently cited a study by US Trust that found that “one-fifth of all high net worth individuals (with $3 million or more in investable assets) are holding more than 25% of their portfolio in cash.” This is consistent with our anecdotal conversations with individual investors and family offices. Sure, we occasionally run into investors who hold virtually no cash, choosing to margin securities when they buy a car or pay tuition. But most investors do keep a meaningful cash allocation. One family office we know is 100% in cash – to the tune of $250 million.

For most investors, having a sizable cash cushion helps them manage both personal and portfolio risk. As I discussed in a recent interview with Christine Benz at Morningstar, we all remember the depths of the financial crisis. Most investors prefer to have a cash cushion to withstand economic swings. They also like to have on hand some “dry powder” that can profitably deployed, so that they can, in the words of Warren Buffett, “be greedy when others are fearful.” Cash can serve not only as a hedge, but also as a strategic reserve.

Among the most conservative investors are investment bankers, many of whom hold seven figures in cash. Working in a volatile industry, where layoffs accompany each business cycle, it makes sense to hold a rainy-day fund in cash. Law firm partners are similar. One leading private banker told me his white-shoe law firm clients tend to hold between $1 million and $3 million in cash, with one client holding a staggering $20 million, all earning no more than 0.30%. Whether that reflects inertia or a deliberate allocation doesn’t matter – what matters is how clients invest that cash, to ensure it doesn’t unduly drag down the returns of the entire portfolio.

At Max, we don’t take a view on how much cash investors should hold – each individual is different, and should consult with his or her financial advisor to determine what’s prudent. However, for whatever portion of your portfolio that you’ve chosen to hold in cash, you ought to earn as much as possible on it, while ensuring that it is safe, insured, and accessible when you need it.

MaxMyInterest is a cash management solution that helps investors earn substantially more on their cash, while keeping it safe. Max members are today earning a weighted average 0.89% on their cash, held in their own accounts at leading FDIC-insured online banks such as American Express, Barclays and GE Capital. As interest rates change, Max automatically reallocates cash to help ensure its members benefit from the best rates available. Best of all, Max members need not change the way that they interact with their existing checking account, so direct deposit, bill pay, and access to tellers and notaries remain unchanged.

An incremental 0.80% of return can be meaningful, particularly when compounded over time. Savvy investors know that it’s important to monitor every aspect of portfolio risk and return. With Max, investors can generate incremental return without incremental risk, the holy grail of investing. So, much like you wouldn’t put up with a mutual fund that consistently underperformed the market by 0.80%, no longer should you suffer such a fate from cash.

We’re all busy, and focusing on cash often falls to the bottom of the To Do list. However, Max was designed so that – after a one-time setup – you never have to think about your cash again. You can just sit back, knowing that the cash portion of your portfolio is optimally invested in your own FDIC-insured bank accounts.